Colome Sweeps Marty

Colome swept Marty in a prep volleyball match on Sept. 10. Set scores were 25-10, 25-14, 25-12.

Makayla Shippy had nine aces and 20 assists. Rayne Hermsen added three aces, five digs, four kills and one block.

Kaydee Heath led the team with 10 kills and five digs.

Saydee Heath finished with six kills while Carleen Burger had 5 kills.

Platte-Geddes defeated Colome 3-1 on Sept. 11. The scores were 25-13, 25-19, 25-27 and 25-22.

Shippy had 28 assists and four digs. Kaydee Heath had 13 kills, eight digs, two blocks and an ace.

Hermsen had six kills and five digs and two aces.

Lady Warriors Place 2nd at Big Dakota

 

Winner Area girls cross country team took second place in the Big Dakota Conference and Chamberlain Invite on Thursday.

Sidda Schuyler placed 4th. She was followed by Saige Schuyler, 9th; Jaclyn Laprath, 18th; Aryn Meiners, 28th; Meagan Blare, 41st; Melanie Brozik, 59th.

In the varsity boys race, Wyatt Turnquist placed 29th and Joseph Laprath placed 59th.

In the junior varsity girls, Madison Thieman placed 10th; Gabby Kocer, 24th; Katherine Jankauskas, 31st; Trinity Vrbka, 35th.

In the junior high boys, Konner Osborn took 2nd.

The next action for the Winner area team will be Sept 22 at Platte and Sept. 25 at Todd County.

Winner Area girls cross country team won the Lyman Invitational on Saturday.

In the girls varsity, Sidda Schuyler took first. She was followed by Saige Schuyler, 4th; Meagan Blare, 8th; Melanie Brozik, 10th; Aryn Meiners, 14th; Jaclyn Laprath, 20th.

In the varsity boys, Joseph Laprath was 30th.

In the junior varsity girls, Madison Thieman placed 3rd; Gabby Kocer, 8th; Trinity Vrbka, 10th; Katherine Jankauskas, 11th.

Konner Osborn placed 4th in the junior boys division.

Watson Leads Golfers

Parkston won the team title in the Winner boys golf invitational on Sept. 11. Second place went to Mobridge-Pollock and third to Chamberlain.

Gage Watson led the Warriors as he placed 12th.

Nathan Monk placed 32nd.

In the junior varsity, Landon Calhoon placed 4th; Ryder Halligan, 5th and Karson Keiser, 7th.

The Winner boys golfers competed in the Todd County Invitational on Thursday.

Gage Watson shot an 81 and Nathan Monk shot a 101.

Watson placed fifth in the tournament.

In the middle school results, Karson Keiser shot a 47, Ryder Halligan, 48 and Landon Calhoon, 51.

The Winner boys golfers competed in the Todd County Invitational on Thursday.

Gage Watson shot an 81 and Nathan Monk shot a 101.

Watson placed fifth in the tournament.

In the middle school results, Karson Keiser shot a 47, Ryder Halligan, 48 and Landon Calhoon, 51.

William Matousek, 83

William Matousek passed away at the Sanford Medical Center in Sioux Falls on Sept. 14, 2018 following complications after a hard fall earlier in the month. A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 21, 2018 starting at 10 a.m. at the Carter Gospel Fellowship Church in Carter, South Dakota.

Bill was born in Sioux City on Jan. 26, 1935 to parents William and Louise (McDonald) Matousek. He moved with his parents to Carter, SD the following year where his father engaged in farming and ranching. He attended The Carter Elementary School (1949), Winner High School (1953), and the University of South Dakota (1957). He served as a Lieutenant in the United States Army intelligence services in Providence, RI for two years after graduation from USD. Following separation from the military, Bill settled in Boston where he pursued a life of professional diversity and international travel. Part of this time was spent in the Arctic Circle doing research.

Bill returned to South Dakota in 2000 and settled in the Carter and Winner area. He managed his ranch lands and was a great supporter of the Tripp County area. He was also active in supporting the University of South Dakota and took part in local charity fund raising events.

Bill and his brother Bob were both graduates of the University of South Dakota (USD) and the two of them funded many projects, scholarships, and other ventures at the university.

However, their greatest satisfaction came from supporting the USD John T. Vucurevich Children’s Center and its preschool that was named in honor of their parents, Bill and Louise Matousek.

Bill was the epitome of generosity and the betterment of our entire community was extremely important to him. If there was a cause in our community that was in need, Bill was the first to commit to helping in any way he could. Bill was one of the founding board members of the Tripp Co. Community Foundation and served as chairman until 2017. Through the foundation he established the Harold Smith Memorial Scholarship fund to recognize Harold for his years of teaching students at the Winner High School. He also established the William J. Matousek & Marjory E. Calderia Fund to be used for grant making for a variety of community organizations needs in the Tripp County area.

Bill was very proud of his roots in the Tripp County area and especially of his alma mater, WHS! Bill was the 1952 Homecoming Warrior and every year was proud to attend roll call for the class of 1953. Everyone remembers him as the voice of the Tripp County Community Foundation as each year he took liberties with the microphone at roll call to put a plug in for the foundation. In 2017 Bill was humbled and honored to be selected as the WHS Homecoming Parade Marshal.

Bill will be forever remembered as the face of the Red Kettle campaign of the Salvation Army in our area. During the holidays he spent countless hours lining up youth and adult volunteers to ring the Salvation Army bell in town. This was important to him and many hours of his own time were spent ringing the bells. No philanthropic effort was too big or small for him to tackle.

There was no greater supporter of the Tripp County community than Bill. Everything he did, he did quietly, behind the scenes, not looking for self-promotion or fame. He did these things because of his great compassion to help others and high hopes for the future of our community. He will be greatly missed by all of his friends in the Tripp County area.

He was preceded in death by his parents, his life-partner Marjory Caldeira (2017), and his younger brother Robert (Bob, 2018). He is survived by his brother Jan of Denver, CO, sister-in-law Colette Clowes Matousek of Tiburon, CA, nephew Peter Matousek & Kristin Unger, niece Kathryn Steinberg, their children, along with numerous cousins.

His family appreciates his faithful neighbors, his friends, his professional associates, and his medical team for the support and encouragement through life and in death. The family ask that you make any donations in his memory to your local church or the charity of your choice — which might include: The Salvation Army, Tripp County Community Foundation – William J. Matousek & Marjory E. Caldeira Fund, PO Box 111, Winner, SD 57580.

Joan Brinckmeyer, 80

Joan Brinckmeyer, 80, of Presho, died Monday, Sept. 10 at Avera Maryhouse in Pierre.

Service will be 1 pm, Wednesday, Sept. 19 at Presho United Methodist Church with burial at Presho City Cemetery

Arrangements have been placed in the care of Isburg Funeral Chapel. Online condolences may be made at www.isburgfuneralchapels.com

Mary “Joan” Brinckmeyer was born in Chamberlain, South Dakota on Oct. 8, 1937 to Vincent “Bink” and Violet (Werner) Snodgrass. Joan was raised in Presho and graduated from Presho High School. Joan and her family also resided in Wood, South Dakota. Joan was employed as a bookkeeper for Farmer Elevator and served as the Lyman County Auditor for 30 years. After retirement, Joan enjoyed many months in Arizona and California.

Joan loved attending the Chicago Cubs spring training and being a member of the “Wild Bunch”, playing cribbage, watching basketball, shopping and most importantly her four legged baby boy Domino. Her children, grandchildren and her extended family were the love of her life and she loved spending time with them. Joan was a member of the United Methodist Church.

Joan was united in marriage to Alvie Uthe in Presho on May 28, 1955. After his death, she met and married Allen D. Brinckmeyer on Sept. 4, 1963 in Ft. Pierre.

Joan is survived by her daughters: Cindy Canaga, Rhonda (Blaine) Drageset, Tammy (Steve) Kokas, Liza Brinckmeyer, (Rod); step children Lynn Brinckmeyer and Jeff Brinckmeyer; daughter-in-law Debby Uthe and by her 10 grandchildren: Derek, Nicole, Justin, Brandi, Brent, Matt, Kelly, James, Wesley and Jessica; her step grandchildren, and her great grandchildren. Joan also leaves her brother, Gary Snodgrass, her sister Linda Goltz, extended family and her many dear friends.

Joan was preceded in death by her parents, “Bink” and Violet Snodgrass, her husbands Alvie Uthe and Allen D. Brinckmeyer, her son Curtis Uthe, son-in-law Patrick Canaga, and great granddaughter Alana. Also preceding her in death was her stepdaughter Melinda Dube and stepson, Max Brinckmeyer.

Marguerite Hutchison, 86

Marguerite Hutchison, 86, of Winner, SD passed away on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018 at the Winner Regional Healthcare Center in Winner.

Funeral service were held on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018 at 10 a.m.. at the Mason Funeral Home. Burial followed in the Winner City Cemetery.

Marge was born Aug. 31, 1932 at home in Hamill SD to Bruce Herman and Minnie (Mundlein) Herman.

After graduating High School in Chamberlain, she was married. From this union Terry Lee was born.

On Aug. 23, 1958 she married her true love, Robert Hutchison. To this union Robyn Elise and Jeffrey James were born. They eventually made their home at the ranch along the White River south of Presho.

Marge enjoyed her life on the ranch tending the cattle and helping put up hay. She always had a very large garden. Marge taught Sunday School many years at the Community Bible Church in Presho and was also active in her local Women’s Bible Study. After moving to Golden Prairie Manor, she still grew tomatoes on her patio every summer and loved to play cards every day.

Mom leaves us with many fond memories and we will always remember the story of when Bob ran over her with the 4-wheeler during calving. Marge leaves a legacy of hard work and the true love she always had for Bob.

Marge is survived by her children, Terry (Nancy), Robyn, and Jeff (Connie); Grandchildren Colin (Kasey),

Brianne, Jesse (Timmi), and Cody (Brooke). Great grandchildren; Caelyn, Claire, and Dashel. One sister Norma Johnson; Sister-in-laws Twila Herman and Lois Warner. Many nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Bruce and Minnie, husband Robert, brother Raymond, brother-in-law Miles and one great granddaughter.

Blaine Kennobie, 79

Blaine Kennobie, 79, of Kennebec, died Saturday, Sept. 8 at Rapid City Regional Hospital. Services were held at 2 pm, Friday, Sept. 14 at American Lutheran Church in Kennebec with burial at Kennebec Cemetery.

Arrangements have been placed in the care of Isburg Funeral Chapel. Online condolences may be made at www.isburgfuneralchapels.com

Blaine “Pete” Martin Kenobbie was born on Mother’s Day, May 14, 1939 on his grandfather Henry Cross’s Farm SE of Webb, IA to Bernerd Blaine and Tressie Fern (Cross) Kenobbie

When Blaine was almost a year old his family moved to South Dakota. He started school in a country school house north of Presho. They lived on what was called the Reed Ranch. This is where Blaine developed his love for the South Dakota prairies, which would stay dear to his heart forever.

At the age of 10 his family moved back to Webb, IA where he continued his schooling. Pete loved the outdoors. He enjoyed horseback riding, hunting, ice skating, sledding and skiing. During his school years he was active in church activities, baseball, basketball and FFA.

Later the Kenobbie family bought a farm SE of Greenville, IA. At this time he attended the Greenville-Rossie High School. This is where he met the prettiest girl in school, Beverly Carol Bryan, the love of his life. Blaine and Beverly graduated together in the Class of 1957 as High School Sweethearts.

On June 28, 1959 Blaine and Beverly were united in marriage at the Congregational Church in Sioux Rapids, IA. They were blessed with four children: Randy, Carol, Roger and Roy. While farming and raising livestock, Blaine and Bev lived in Greenville, Gillett Grove, and Webb. In July of 1969 they settled on a farm NW of Laurens, IA. Here they spent the next 17 years raising their family, farming, milking cows and raising livestock. You could say they had an Old McDonalds Farm with almost every animal you can think of.

Blaine’s roots kept calling him back to South Dakota. In the spring of 1986 they made the big move west taking everything – machinery and cattle included. For the next nine years they lived in various places raising cattle. Blaine also worked part time during the winter months at the Chamberlain John Deere, working on equipment.
In 1996 Blaine got his boyhood dream of owning his own land in Lyman County, SD where all you see is prairie and sky. This is where they’ve made their home ever since.

Through the years Blaine has enjoyed playing basketball in high school, square dancing, playing cards, pheasant hunting, riding horses and playing his guitar and singing to his sweetheart Bev. Another favorite pastime was collecting and restoring many old two-cylinder John Deere tractors and implements.

In later years Pete really enjoyed South Dakota history and reminiscing of the cowboy days and life on the range. So his dream of becoming a “West River Cowboy” really did come true. He was truly at home riding the prairies of South Dakota.

Grateful for having shared his life are his wife of 59 years, Beverly; son Randy (Deb) Kenobbie of Laurens, IA; daughter Carol (Scott) Banks of Spencer, IA; son Roger Kenobbie of Kimble, SD; son Roy (Marcia) Kenobbie of Hot Springs, SD; 13 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; two sisters: Joyce (Stan) Garton of Odenville, AL, Carolyn Beasley of Centralia, MO; two brothers Dan Kenobbie of Newnan, GA and Lyle (Linda) Kenobbie of Greenville, IA, and many nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.

Blaine was preceded in death by his parents Bernerd and Tressie; his in-laws Wesley and Margaret Bryan; sister Betty Lou Kenobbie; daughter-in-law Tammy Kenobbie; two sisters-in-law: Karen Kenobbie and Judy Kenobbie; two brothers-in-law: Don Bryan and Ray Beasley; niece Valerie Wilson and grandson-in-law Cole Buchholz.

New Rosebud Sioux Tribe President Sworn Into Office

On Sept. 4, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe held a swearing-In ceremony for recently elected president, Rodney M. Bordeaux; the re-elected vice president, Scott Herman; and 10 Council Representatives. In Previous years, President Bordeaux had also served three terms( 2005-07, 2007-09, 2009-12) and was quick at filling his seven critical staff positions.

President Bordeaux serves as Itancan, chairman of council and is the chief executive of the tribe. In his opening address, President Bordeaux stated that he will work closely with newly re-elected Vice President Herman and each of the council representatives. President Bordeaux said, “We have been charged with a great opportunity to work for our people and the dedication that it takes to do that will be challenging at times, but we can do this together”.

President Bordeaux also expressed his commitment to serving the Oyate. He pledged to increase communication between tribal government and the people, by using all available outlets from social media to traditional newsprint to keep the public informed. The President also plans to visit students at Saint Francis Indian School, Todd County and other schools, where he hopes to inspire a new generation of leaders.

Tina Spotted Calf-Martinez, who has been appointed as the executive assistant to the president, and had previously served as the Department chairwoman for the Lakota Studies Department at the Sinte Gleska University, said on her first day in the office that, “This office is designed to make a difference for our oyate by expecting accountability and being a great role model, along with a healthy approach” .

The president’s office also appointed: Mary Lambert, Administrative Assistant; Leanora Fast Dog, Administrative Assistant; John Spotted Tail, Community Liaison; Sarah Hart, Program Specialist; Nicole Marshall, Executive Administrative Assistant; and Madonna Sitting Bear, Economic Research & Development Specialist.

 

 

Colome High School Plans Homecoming

A century of education at Colome High School will be celebrated during the annual homecoming celebration Sept 13-14.

The royalty candidates are: Beau Bertram, Wyatt Cahoy, Jackson Kinzer, Layton Thieman, Kaydee Heath, Rayne Hermsen, Jaclyn Laprath and Matrix Noteboom.

The coronation and alumni roll call will be at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13 in the Colome gym.

The honor guard at coronation will be Carleen Burger, Cheyenne Dougherty, Haley Krumpus, Jordyn Seegers, Jacob Beckers, Matt Bossert, Adam Cable and Cailob Week.

The ushers are Saydee Heath, Clarissa Ringing Shield, Allan McKenzie and Linkyn Petersek.

Handing out programs will be Shambraea Bettcher, Abby Eliason, Brayden Seegers, Riley Shippy.

The Cowboy Olympics will be at 8:15 a.m. in the school gym.

The homecoming parade will be Friday at 1 p.m. with the parade theme “CHS—Celebrating a century.”

After the parade, there will be an open house at the school.

There will be a tailgate party at the football field at 5 p.m. on Friday.

The football game will be start at 7 p.m. as the Cowboys takes on Gayville-Volin.

The alumni chicken dinner will be held on Friday at the Legion from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

The Colome Legion Auxiliary will be serving suppers from the regular menu on Thursday Sept. 13 from 6-9 p.m.

On Saturday the Legion Auxiliary will be serving from the regular menu from 6-9 p.m. This is open to the public and alumni.

CCI Celebrates “Direct Support Professional Week”

Direct Support Professional (DSP) Week is Sept. 91-15. Community Connections Inc. in Winner employs 67 persons with 54 positions being in direct support professional.

DSPs ensure people with disabilities have the necessary supports that enable them to live, work and enjoy live as independently as possible in their community. DSPs can work in a number of different settings and often have opportunities to share their own passion and talents with the people they support.

The direct support workforce is made up of 3.6 million workers in the United States. The demand for direct support workers is expected to increase by 35 percent from 2008 to 2018.

DSPs assist people receiving community human services in a wide range of activities such as meeting personal needs, making friends, finding a job, understanding rights and making choices, taking medications, learning new skills and facilitating connections to the people, resources and experiences necessary to live full and safely in communities of their choice.

South Dakota’s network of Intellectual and Developmental Disability (I/DD) non profit service providers reach every corner of the state and provide services to approximately 4,360 South Dakotans with I/DD and employ approximately 3,491 people.

DSPs have highly specialized and important jobs in the support of people with I/DD. The DSP position is the backbone of the Intellectual and Development Disability services. DSPs require extensive training in behavioral intervention, medication administration, crisis intervention, communication and person centered supports. DSPs routinely make sound judgments regarding behavioral health and general safety. DSPs have to meet increasingly complex regulatory requirements.

Melony Bertram, executive director of CCI, says the career is rewarding because DSPs help the people they serve learn new skills and reach life goals. On a daily basis, DSPs help individuals with tasks most other people take for granted. Tasks like cooking, cleaning, showering, toileting, leaving the house, shopping and managing money take a little more effort for individuals with IDD. DSPs assist with tasks individuals cannot do for themselves and teach tasks individuals can learn to do themselves. Both the individual and DSP feel a great sense of accomplishment when the individual learns to complete a new task.

Without DSP’s our business would be obsolete. Direct Support Professionals are the heart and soul of the what we do,” said Bertram.